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People who provide unpaid care for loved ones with Alzheimer’s disease are heroes in our book. But that does not mean their job isn’t difficult — or lonely. I have had the good fortune of meeting with these heroes many times over the years, and my practice has always been dedicated to providing valuable information about the support and resources that many Alzheimer’s caregivers don’t realize is readily available to them and easily within a fingertip’s reach.

In my book, You’re Not Alone: Living as an Alzheimer’s Caregiver, I acknowledge how powerless it can feel when you do not know where to turn for help. Below is a support and list of resources for Alzheimer’s caregivers to keep handy.

Caregivers deserve to have a helping hand, too!

According to the National Institute on Aging, many caregivers find that building a local support system is a key way for them to get help. That local support system might include family members and friends, faith groups, and caregiver support groups. Here are a few more to add to that list.

Alzheimer’s Resources for Caregivers

NIA Alzheimer’s and related Dementia Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center
Email: adear@nia.nih.gov
Phone: 800-438-4380
www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers
This center offers information on diagnosis, treatment, patient care, caregiver needs, long-term care, and research and clini-cal trials related to Alzheimer’s disease. You can also get hints on how to talk to a doctor, financial and legal planning, and more. Staff can refer you to local and national resources, or you can search for yourself on their user-friendly website.

Alzheimer’s Association
Phone: 800-272-3900
www.alz.org
This association offers information, a helpline, and support services to people with Alzheimer’s and their caregivers. Local chapters across the country offer support groups. Call or go online to find out where to get help in your area.

Alzheimer’s Foundation of America
Phone: 866-232-8484
www.alzfdn.org
They provide information about how to care for people with Alzheimer’s as well as a list of services for people with the dis-ease. They also offer information for caregivers and their families through member organizations. Services include toll-free hotlines, publications, and other educational materials.

Eldercare Locator
Phone: 800-677-1116
www.eldercare.acl.gov
Caregivers often need information about community resources, such as home care, adult day care, meal care, and nursing homes. Contact the Eldercare Locator to find these resources in your area.

National Institute on Aging Information Center
Email: niaic@nia.nih.gov
Phone: 1800-222-2225
www.nia.nih.gov/health
This center offers free publications about aging. They can be viewed, printed, and ordered online.

Meals on Wheels
Phone: 888-998-6325
www.mealsonwheelsamerica.org
Meal services bring hot meals to the person’s home or your home. The delivery staff does not feed the person, but this is a valuable resource and one less item to add to your daily to-do list.

National Adult Day Services Association
Phone: 877-745-1440
Adult day care services provide a safe environment, activities, and staff who pay attention to the needs of the person with Alzheimer’s in an adult day care facility. They also provide transportation when needed.

ARCH National Respite Locator
www.archrespite.org/respitelocator
Respite services provide short-term care for the person with Alzheimer’s at home, in a healthcare facility, or at an adult day care center. The care may last for as short as a few hours or as long as several weeks. This is an extremely helpful service when you need a rest as a caregiver or want to go on vacation.

Aging Life Care Association
Phone: 520-881-8008
www.aginglifecare.org
Aging life care professionals make a home visit and suggest needed services.

Hospice Resources

National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization
Phone: 800-658-8898
www.nhpco.org/find-hospice

National Association for Home Care & Hospice
Phone: 202-547-7424
www.agencylocator.nahc.org

Hospice Foundation of America
Phone: 800-854-3402
www.hospicefoundation.org

Hospice services provide care for a person who is near the end of life. They keep the person who is dying as comfortable and pain-free as possible and provide care in the home or a hospice facility. They also support the family in providing in-home or end-of-life care.

Remember that help can come in so many forms, each one as reassuring, supportive, and inspirational as the others. We hope that you will find this list of support and resource services helpful.

Call Leigh Hilton PLLC today!

Please call Leigh Hilton PLLC if we can help answer any questions you have about the resources for Alzheimer’s caregivers mentioned in this blog post. Leigh Hilton PLLC wants to be your first call whenever any estate planning or elder law advice or action is needed.

We look forward to serving you.

Thanks for reading!

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